Interruption Management
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Interruption Management

Monday, February 13, 2017

Sleep, Interrupted, is no Fun - Interruption Management

Go to bed when you're tired, not when you think you ought to. Let your body talk to you. It'll tell you when it's tired. The problem you've had in the past is that you have ignored the messages.

Once a week, get to bed by 9:00 p.m. Your body will thank you. Let yourself sleep for nine, ten hours, whatever it takes. Allow yourself at least one weeknight in which getting sleep is your only objective.


If you're kept awake by your spouse's snoring, or you're the one snoring, you need help. Get a snore control device like those available from airline shopper magazines. A small device attaches to your wrist, and whenever you’re snoring above a certain decibel, a gentle vibration breaks the pattern and helps you return to quiet sleep.

Moderate exercise a couple hours before retiring aids in getting sound sleep. If you are too active too close to retiring, you may take longer to relax enough to doze off.

Moderate intake of proteins, such as a glass of milk, also helps you sleep soundly.

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Sunday, February 05, 2017

Concentrate Despite the Clutter - Interruption Management

Years ago, I attended Sam Horn's session on concentration -- still great advice to this day in the face of too many potential interruptions!

* Concentration defined: voluntarily focused attention.
* Discipline of ignoring irrelevant matters
* Fixing ones' powers, efforts and attention
* Most people work best under a deadline; when their concentration is focused.
* Fatigue is a big road block to concentration

This last note is telling!:
* Society is moving towards a lower frustration tolerance with less discipline, and more need for immediate gratification. These are detriments to concentration.

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Sunday, January 29, 2017

Over-Connected, Constant Interruption - Interruption Management

An article 12 years ago today in USA Today said it all: “Personal computers, cellphones, and high-speed Internet are considered essential to getting by for millions of Americans who are showing early signs of addiction to the next wave of high-tech toys…”

The article went on to say that “many people… consider high-tech gadgetry essential to modern life,” and quoted psychologist Bob Greenfield who observed, "Part of the reason is the hype, the commercial selling of it. Some people feel the products will improve the quality of their lives. But do we really need to be connected in every way, shape or form?"

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Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Seek Understanding - Interruption Management

Lists of information management tips can leave me cold. The notion that merely following some set of guidelines without understanding the magnitude of the situation relegates any such list, however important, to the status of a temporary fix that will soon lose potency.

Understanding the "why" has an impact for those who are willing to make significant and lasting headway on the issue.

Virtually every career professional has read at least one time management book and many articles, and all have encountered time management tips in list form and virtually everyone remains continually pressed for time. So, is the solution to retrieve one's list and apply it more diligently? Or would a more sound approach be to understand the pervasive nature of time pressure in our society, to take a big picture look at one's life and career, and begin to creatively address situations? I would opt for the latter every time!

While we all like lists, in five to seven days, most people will not even be able to *find* whatever list you give them, however valuable they regarded it at one time. It is better to strive to attain understanding of the issue than it is to add yet another list to the one's personal "collection."

The best of both worlds might be to strive for understanding, then apply some guidelines from a list.
Those who insist on a list (really a magic wand), in a few weeks hence, will be right back doing exactly what they've been doing, whereas those who tried to gain understanding will have the potential to achieve professional and personal breakthroughs!

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Thursday, January 19, 2017

Password Data as Needed - Interruption Management

If something happens to you tomorrow, would any family member or trusted friend be able to navigate your computer system, have login and password information, and help manage your accounts, or would there be a major interruption in your ability to transfer this information and wealth?

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Thursday, January 12, 2017

Daily Distractions - Interruption Management

Vast segments of the population have turned to online exhibitionism. Writing in the Washington Post, economist Robert J. Samuelson observed this six years ago, and the situation has gotten worse today. “It turns out that the Internet has unleashed the greatest outburst of mass exhibitionism in human history.”

“People seem to crave popularity or celebrity more than they fear the loss of privacy.” However, “what goes on the Internet often stays on the Internet."

Of particular concern: Something that seems harmless, silly, or merely impetuous today might seem offensive, stupid or reckless in two weeks, two years, or two decades,” said Samuelson. “Henry David Thoreau famously remarked that ‘the mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation.’ Thanks to technology, that's no longer necessary. People can now lead lives of noisy and ostentatious desperation...”

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Tuesday, January 03, 2017

Less Decision Fatigue in the New Year - Interruption Management

"Do You Suffer From Decision Fatigue?" in the New York Times in 2011 is worth reading today.

An excerpt:
"Decision fatigue helps explain why ordinarily sensible people get angry at colleagues and families, splurge on clothes, buy junk food at the supermarket and can’t resist the dealer’s offer to rustproof their new car. No matter how rational and high-minded you try to be, you can’t make decision after decision without paying a biological price. It’s different from ordinary physical fatigue -- you’re not consciously aware of being tired -- but you’re low on mental energy. The more choices you make throughout the day, the harder each one becomes for your brain, and eventually it looks for shortcuts, usually in either of two very different ways."

The antidote: slow down, focus on what counts, let go of trivial and peripheral issues, and have a life.

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Jeff Davidson - Expert at Managing Interruption Overload

contact author Jeff Davidson
Jeff Davidson: Bio

Managing Interruption Overload

Is the constant crushing burden of information and communication overload dragging you down, pulling you off course, and impeding your effectiveness? By the end of your workday, do you feel overworked, overwhelmed, stressed, and exhausted? Would you like to be more focused, productive, and competitive, while remaining balanced and in control?

If you're continually facing too many interruptions and too many demands, you need Breathing Space.


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